Frihamnen in Stockholm celebrates 100 years

By on September 17, 2019
Fredrik Lindstål (C), Chairman of Stockholm's Ports

Stockholm is growing and new districts are being developed while the port operations are being modernized. This year, Frihamnen celebrates 100 years and takes the step into the next century. Container traffic and the oil port are moving out of the inner city while ferry and cruise traffic are being developed to give even more character to Norra Djurgårdsstaden.

– The Frihamnen in Stockholm has played an important role in social history and is worth celebrating. When it opened in 1919, it was Sweden’s first free port and Stockholm’s first storage port with storage, refrigeration and freezer compartments. This was the country’s major pantry during the Second World War, says Fredrik Lindstål (C), chairman of Stockholm’s Ports.

Today, Frihamnen is more than a port. The old magazines and premises provide office space for about 100 companies in a variety of industries. As container traffic and the oil port move out, Stockholm’s Ports aim to enable even more corporate start-ups in the area.

– The harbor area is unique with an exciting mix of activities with everything from museums and microbreweries to media giants and small individual companies. The large area could house even more businesses, which is also the goal, continues Fredrik Lindstål (C).

Grand celebration with something for everyone
On September 21, at 15-23, Stockholm’s Ports will open Frihamnen together with the tenants in the area. Visitors will be able to see, among other things, the new container port in VR, go on historical walks in the area, and for the boat enthusiast, the display of tugs and other vessels is arranged. Good food is served from various food trucks, a beer festival takes place in the center of Frihamnen, and the DJ collective Sugarcane plays music from 19 o’clock.

More information at: https://www.stockholmshamnar.se/stockholm/frihamnen-live-219/

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