Aquaria opens a new exhibition about threatened frogs

By on May 25, 2017

Half of the earth’s all frog species are currently extinct threatened and in just 40 years, over 200 species have died out. Just before the feast of the Ascension, Aquaria opens its new exhibition “Fantastic Frogs”, where everything from leaf frog to the most poisonous frog in the world appears with the hope of increasing the awareness of the visitors about the threat to the frogs.

Today, Thursday 25 May, Aquaria in Stockholm opens its brand new exhibition “Fantastic Frogs”. In it, visitors will see amazing batrachian from different parts of the tropical world. Everything from Malaysian horn frogs, tomato frogs and night-active leaf frogs to Phyllobates terribilis (the most poisonous frog in the whole world) will be displayed.

Frogs, paddies and salamanders have jumped or crawled on earth since long before the dinosaurs’ time. They are available in different colors and body shapes and go through amazing changes during their lifetime. Frogs are also called indicator species, which means that they are species that clearly and rapidly suffer from changes in their environment, thus giving an indication of how other life in the ecosystem feels. Therefore, it is vital to act in order to preserve the batrachian around the world. But the threats to them are many and today there are around half of the world’s 7551 frog species threatened, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Only since 1979, about 200 frog species have died completely.

– We have built an amazingly beautiful exhibition that we hope our guests will be inspired by. We want our guests to want more and go home and discover the frogs around the knot. There is a lot you can do with small funds to be with and change the future for these animals, said Sandra Wilke, location manager at Aquaria.

The exhibition will take place throughout 2017, aiming at raising awareness of these incomparable animals and the threats they face.

Entertainment | Stockholm
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